Paradise Alley

Sly Stallone and “The Drawings of Bob Peak”

The Bob Peak drawing above is of Sylvester Stallone from Paradise Alley!

I discovered the piece as part of an advertisement for a new book of Bob Peak drawings being put together by Thomas Peak through Kickstarter. Here’s the book’s description…

“THE DRAWINGS OF BOB PEAK”. This new 160 page oversized soft cover book (14″ x 11″) curated collection of his best drawings is a comprehensive look into a rarely viewed side of Bob Peak with never before seen charcoal, graphite, art marker, pen, ink, pencil, and pastel drawings from the maestro himself. This oversized book will take on the look and feel of the actual artwork with drawings large enough to study and admire the mastery of the artist Bob Peak. A “Collectors Edition” of (100 copies only) is also available. Produced by Art Works Fine Art Publishing which also produced the original “The Art of Bob Peak” book, this new book will be of the same high quality that you expect and I require. I will produce nothing surrounding the legacy of my father Bob Peak that does not meet with the highest standards. I appreciate your support. You will NOT be disappointed.

I’ve backed the project and look forward to getting the book in my mitts. If this sounds like something you’d like, then jump on board!

Crowining Mr. Sports Movies

On April 9, 2014, Yahoo! Movies took a look at which actor had played the most sports roles in their piece Crowining Mr. Sports Movies by Brian Enk.

Had they counted each Rocky movie individually (as I think they should have) then Sly would have easily come in first.  At any rate, here’s what the said about him…

—Sylvester Stallone: If we were to tally sports movies as a whole, including sequels, the Italian Stallion would be our champ, with six entries as boxer Rocky Balboa in the “Rocky” movies. Sly’s other sports movie credits include “Death Race 2000” (1975), in which he played deadly cross country racer Machine Gun Joe Viterbo; “Paradise Alley” (1978), in which he played Cosmo Corboni, one of three brothers trying to play the wrestling game in 1940s NYC; “Victory” (1981), in which he played a soccer goalie for the Allied forces as they face off against a German team at a WWII prison camp; “Over the Top” (1986), the greatest arm-wrestling movie ever made; “Driven” (2001), in which he plays former CART champion and car racing mentor Joe Tanto; and “Grudge Match” (2013), in which he plays former boxing champ Henry “Razor” Sharp.

Stallone’s Paradise Alley is Like Nothing Else


On September 27, 2013, A.V. Club posted, Sly Stallone’s Paradise Alley is Like Nothing Else he Ever Made by  Ignatiy Vishnevetsky.   Here’s a taste…

Sylvester Stallone’s directorial debut, Paradise Alley, is a prototypical vanity project: a wrestling-themed period piece set in 1940s New York that opens with Stallone warbling a maudlin piano ballad over the credits. However, unlike Stallone’s subsequent directorial efforts—all but two of them Rocky or Rambo movies—it wasn’t produced to satisfy franchise fans or meet genre expectations; when Paradise Alleywas greenlit, Stallone was considered a bankable Oscar-nominated screenwriter and actor, rather than a bankable action star.